Skip to main content

Little Magazines: Little Magazines in Other Libraries

Other ways to find complete runs

Not finding much information in WorldCat? You can also consult:

How to find reprints & microform copies to borrow on interlibrary loan

Usually, we can only borrow reprint or microform copies on interlibrary loan. To find them,

  1. Go into WorldCat

  2. Enter the periodical title
    Be sure to limit to the "title" field.

  3. Enter the publication years, if you know them
    This can be particularly helpful if your little magazine has a short or common title. You can also include the original place of publication. Consult one of the guides and bibliographiesto find this information.

  4. Limit to "Serial Publications"
    Little magazines are types of serials.

  5. Run the search

  6. Closely examine your search results
    Look for records that contain the word "reprint" or that have the microform symbol.
  7. Too many or too few records?
    If you find too many records, go back and limit your search by adding publication years, the place of publication, and/or editor's names.
    If you don't find any record, go back and search just for the magazine title, limited to serial publications.

How to find complete runs of original issues of little magazines

To find complete runs of little magazines and other periodicals,

Search WorldCat
WorldCat includes records for original copies of magazines as well as paper, microform, and some digital reprints.

    1. Enter the periodical title
      Be sure to limit to the "title" field.
    2. Enter the publication years, if you know them
      This can be particularly helpful if your little magazine has a short or common title. You can also include the original place of publication. Consult one of the guides and bibliographiesto find this information.
    3. Limit to "Serial Publications"
      Little magazines are types of serials.
    4. Run the search
    1. Closely examine your search results to identify records that look as if they describe original copies.
       
      Some things to note:
      • You may find more than one record for original issues of a little magazine. This is normal. Library cataloguers have the choice of using a record  created by another library or creating their own record, so it is likely that you will find several records that describe the same original little magazine. Be sure to look at all of them.
      • If you find too many records, go back and limit your search by adding publication years, the place of publication, and/or editor's names.
      • If you don't find any record, go back and search just for the magazine title, limited to serial publications.

    2. View full records
      From the search results list, click on the magazine title to view the full record. Read through the record. Look for:
      • The original dates and place of publication.
      • An indication that this the record may describe a reprint. The word "reprint" may appear, or a reprint publisher may be listed. Publishers that reprinted little magazines include Kraus and the Johnsonian Reprint Corporation. You'll want to exclude these records.

    1. View "Libraries Worldwide"
      If the full record looks as if it describes the original publication, click on "Libraries worldwide" (in the "Availability" field, near the top of the record) to view information about the libraries that have indicated that they own all or part of the title.

       

    2. Check individual libraries' holdings
      In most cases, the library names will be hotlinked on the "Libraries Worldwide" page in WorldCat. Some libraries may also list the years that they own. You will need to check each library's catalog to confirm their holdings, however; click on the hotlinked library name to go to their catalog.
      In many cases, you will be taken directly to the record for the little magazine; in other cases, you will need to do a title search in the individual library's catalog.
       
      Examine each library's record for the title. Look for:
      • Confirmation that the library has a complete run.
      • An indication that the title is in the original format. Where is it located in the library? Paper issues are normally shelved in a Periodicals area, storage facility, Special Collections library, or similar location. 
    Still not sure? Contact the library to confirm that they have original issues. I recommend that you email the reference librarians; most libraries have an email reference service. Be sure to tell the reference librarians the exact information that you need, and why. Library staff will need to go to the shelf to check the format for you. Be polite and considerate of their time, and give them as much information as you can. For example,
    • "I'm working on a class project; we are creating a Web-based bibliography of little magazines that includes information about the libraries nationwide that own complete runs of the titles. It looks as if your library has a complete run of ____ magazine; would you be willing to check on that for me so that we can include accurate information on our Web site?"
    • Find the call number and/or location of the magazine in the library's catalog and give that information to the librarian.
    • Describe what the original issues should look like, or give the reference librarians a list of things to check. "There were X volumes and Y issues published between these years. There should be individual covers for each issue, as well as advertisements; this shouldn't be a Kraus reprint."

Citation management

Zotero logo

 

Access Zotero                 Zotero Guide

Ask a Librarian

consultation

Schedule a Consultation
with a research librarian
info_desk

Stop by the information desk
call_text

Call: 704-894-2331
Questions? Need help? Ask a Librarian
Davidson College Library, Box 7200, 209 Ridge Rd., Davidson, NC 28035-7200
Creative Commons license logo for CC by-sa 4.0
This Davidson College Library Research Guides are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
All box-title icons from Entypo pictograms by Daniel Bruce — www.entypo.com