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The following databases are newly acquired or being evaluated for a future subscription.
New
Created from the Library Company’s acclaimed Afro-Americana Collection—an accumulation that began with Benjamin Franklin and steadily increased throughout its entire history—this unique online resource provides users with more than 12,000 printed works. These books, pamphlets and broadsides, including many lesser-known imprints, hold an unparalleled record of African American history, literature and culture.
New
This archive contains manuscripts, artwork, and rare printed books dating from the earliest contact with European settlers right up to photographs and newspapers from the mid-twentieth century as well as a wide range of rare and original documents from treaties, speeches and diaries, to historic maps and travel journals.
New
The appearance of the terms “licentious” and “licentiousness” in American periodicals rose dramatically in the early 1840s, in tandem with the origins of these unruly urban newspapers collectively called the Flash Press. The newspapers in American Underworld: The Flash Press covered the seamier aspects of urban life: crime, scandal, brothels and blackmail, combined with reviews of the bawdiest theatrical performances on offer and reports on sporting events such as cock-fighting, boxing and horse racing. The more than sixty papers in American Underworld: The Flash Press were collected by the American Antiquarian Society, whose curators report that they are heavily researched there. They are among the rarest of all American newspapers, and are of particular interest to scholars in the fields of women’s studies, ethnic studies, urban life, criminal activity, and the underground economy and literature of the 19th century.
New
With material drawn from hundreds of institutions and organizations, including both major international activist organizations and local, grassroots groups, the documents in the Archives of Sexuality & Gender: LGBTQ History and Culture since 1940 present important aspects of LGBTQ life in the second half of the twentieth century and beyond.
New
Includes video of over 350 live full length productions – including Digital Theatre’s own recordings alongside collections from the likes of the BBC, Royal Shakespeare Company, Broadway Digital Archive, Royal Opera House, London Symphony Orchestra, as well as in-depth interviews with industry professionals including actors, directors as well as all backstage staff: lighting technicians, fight coordinators, stage managers et al.
New
The nineteenth century witnessed unprecedented growth and sweeping changes in the dramatic arts with the number of theaters in the United States growing a hundredfold. As a result, drama became the most popular form of entertainment in America. It was popular across all classes of society and took myriad forms: historical plays, melodramas, political satires, black minstrel shows, comic operas, musical extravaganzas, parlor entertainments, adaptations of novels and many others. All of these can be found in Nineteenth-Century American Drama: Popular Culture and Entertainment, 1820-1900.
New
Provides over 200 scholarly reference books, with peer-reviewed essays that give detailed analysis in a variety of fields.
Davidson has purchased access to History, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, and Religion collections. Individual articles in other fields may be available via open access.
New
This extensive cross-disciplinary collection of primary sources is available to Davidson during the 2018-19 school year through the Access & Build program.
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